Spam and Scam

A message showed up in my inbox this morning, allegedly from “TRS Staffing Solutions”, which is a real company. This is the text of the message:

A first-class specialty logistics company that is long-lasting represented in more than 10 countries throughout Europe, is employing a full- and part- time employees to assist their growing dynamic and creative team in United States market.

They are looking for a talented team player to fill the open position of Purchasing Specialist.
They offer you a fast-paced work environment, highly competitive salary and turbulent career.

Employment Form: Full- and Part- time
Wage Range: $54,600.00 – $80,200.00/year. The salary is highly competitive and conformable with experience
Career Category: Management
Benefits package available: Health & Life Insurance; Paid Vacation Plan; 401k Retirement Plan; Good Home Time
Relocation Offered: No Relocation required

Key Responsibilities:
– Coordinates supply chain operational activities
– Review late, current, and future project demand and create a plan to meet customer demand
– Identifying cost reduction activities
– agreements to ensure appropriate risk mitigation
– Audit inventory levels daily

General Skills:
– Possesses network understanding
– Able to multitask
– Ability to adapt to a continuously changing working environment
– Ability to understand and anticipate technical issues
– Ability to define problems, collect data, establish facts, and draw valid conclusions
– Ability to pass all background checks and pre-employment tests

All applicants applying for job opening must be authorized to work in the United States, must be a US Lawful Permanent Resident, must be legal age 21+.

If you want to work in an environment where customer service is our passion, please write back to this E-mail

Oh, yeah, like I’m going to believe that. No company logo, no signature which identifies the sender, and best of all, an address Uh, huh. You’re for real, not.

But I was feeling annoyed, and sent back this reply:

On 2014-Mar-06, at 02:11 , TRS Staffing Solutions <> wrote:

[Much blather deleted]

Did you seriously expect that I would reply to your message, given its incredibly dubious appearance? Your “From:” may be “TRS Staffing Solutions”, but you have an “” mail address! The only business that should have an address at “” is AOL. Had your message originated at “”, I may have been enticed to inquire.

And, in the body of your message, you did not include any contact information. “Please write back to this E-mail” has several problems:

1. “E-mail”: Duh. What else could it be? And accepted spellings of this word are “e-mail” or “email”; there is no capital “E”.

2. “write back”: use the word “reply”; it’s shorter and precise. No mail client with which I am familiar has a “write back” command.

3. “where customer service is our passion”: I care not for your passion; I care for mine.

As for the job itself:

“No Relocation required”, yet you do not know what my location is. Where I live, you’re not there.

“Possesses network understanding”. English isn’t your first language, is it? “Possess an understanding of computer networking” might be a better description.

“Ability to define problems, collect data, establish facts, and draw valid conclusions”: The problem is your poor presentation of this alleged job. I collected data on TRS Staffing Solutions, and I draw the valid conclusion that you are NOT a representative of that organization.

And one more observation: “turbulent career”? You don’t even know what “turbulent” means! Anyone looking for a “turbulent” job is an idiot (at least, in my opinion).

Phfft! Phooey! Ditch this spammy scam, and get a real job.


P.S. And where is the signature on *your* message, “Clare”?

Elf Odin, TechRen Enterprises

I feel much better now.

Following your own rules is optional

In my search for gainful, full-time employment, I have used the services of many job-listing agencies. Some of those agencies offer more than mere lists of jobs which match criteria that I have specified; some agencies give helpful hints on job-hunting. How to find ‘your perfect job’, how to interview well, and especially how to write — and what information to include in — your résumé.

A top suggestion for your résumé is to read and re-read it carefully. Do not allow any grammatical or punctuation errors to be present; you are told that ‘at the first sign of an error in your résumé, the person who is reviewing it will stop reading, and discard it’. This is advice which I take seriously: every time that I make any change to my résumé, I read it again and hope not to spot any errors.

This advice apparently does not apply to the job-listing agencies. There is one, whose initials are ‘J.D.’ (intercapped, as many corporate names are), that includes this information in the footer of the job listings which they send several times per day:

“J—D—.com distributes this on-line newsletter regularly for it’s members.”

Yes, folks, “on-line”, which does not contain a hyphen. And despite time after time being told that incorrect punctuation was a potential interview-killer, this agency wrote “it’s members”. Their attention to detail in their own communications is poor.

Make that “very poor”; because there is a copyright line in that same footer:

“© J—D—.com 2005-2012”

Today’s date is 2013 October 8.

I don’t think that I will be trusting this agency to find a job for me.